Toll Free (800) 920-7457
Shrubs:
When creating an enclosure planting, the backbone is normally the shrubs. There are three classes oh shrubs, based on the height to which they grow. Low Growers are classified as one to four feet, Medium Growers are four to seven feet, and Tall Growers are seven to fifteen feet. If you are creating a wall that needs to be tall and wide, use the medium to tall growers. Be sure to choose the appropriate group of shrubs to develop the look you want to create. 

If you area needs a border to be six feet wide or more, an interesting effect can be done by planting tall growers in the rear and low grower in the front. This allows the use of more than one variety, and creates a facer for the larger shrubs. You could also use perennials as the facers for shrubs, adding cheerful pops of color to your outdoor space. 

There are a few general rule when selecting shrubs for your outdoor space, especially for creating a wall:

•  Plant in masses. Groups of three, five, or more of one variety result in a unified effect instead of a spotty appearance.
•  Use the coarser leaved and more vigorous growers in backgrounds and distant places. In the outdoor living room, many shrubs are intimately viewed in the foreground and these might better be the more refined varieties.
•  Think of sequence in bloom. By choosing varieties carefully, flowers can last the entire season in an outdoor living room.
•  Use showy-leaved varieties in limited number only, if at all, and place them only where accent is needed. Remember the function of the shrub is to contribute to the beauty of our outdoor living room as a whole.
•  Do not overlook the ornamental value of fruits. Many shrubs have berries that are more ornamental than their flowers; as an added bonus, the berries attract birds.
•  Consider each shrub for its habit. Is it upright or graceful, dense or open in growth? There is a proper place for each.
The following factors are also important, whether your wall is an informal border or a tightly clipped hedge: 
•  Consider soil and exposure. Some plants do not thrive in poor dry soils. If we have poor soil or difficult exposure, select varieties that are recommended to grow under similar conditions. Use only varieties that are hardy and can be counted upon to produce the expected results.
•  Consider sun and shade in your outdoor living room. Certain varieties will grow well in shade while others do not. Use only shade lovers in shady places.

Any nursery will explain to you that only a few varieties of shrubs will make an excellent hedge, even though nurseries offer a wide plethora of shrubbery. The best hedges will vary based on your section of the country. These hedges will need to be carefully selected for the particular purpose. 

When creating an enclosure planting, the backbone is normally the shrubs. There are three classes oh shrubs, based on the height to which they grow. Low Growers are classified as one to four feet, Medium Growers are four to seven feet, and Tall Growers are seven to fifteen feet. If you are creating a wall that needs to be tall and wide, use the medium to tall growers. Be sure to choose the appropriate group of shrubs to develop the look you want to create. 

If you area needs a border to be six feet wide or more, an interesting effect can be done by planting tall growers in the rear and low grower in the front. This allows the use of more than one variety, and creates a facer for the larger shrubs. You could also use perennials as the facers for shrubs, adding cheerful pops of color to your outdoor space. 

There are a few general rule when selecting shrubs for your outdoor space, especially for creating a wall:

•  Plant in masses. Groups of three, five, or more of one variety result in a unified effect instead of a spotty appearance.
•  Use the coarser leaved and more vigorous growers in backgrounds and distant places. In the outdoor living room, many shrubs are intimately viewed in the foreground and these might better be the more refined varieties.
•  Think of sequence in bloom. By choosing varieties carefully, flowers can last the entire season in an outdoor living room.
•  Use showy-leaved varieties in limited number only, if at all, and place them only where accent is needed. Remember the function of the shrub is to contribute to the beauty of our outdoor living room as a whole.
•  Do not overlook the ornamental value of fruits. Many shrubs have berries that are more ornamental than their flowers; as an added bonus, the berries attract birds.
•  Consider each shrub for its habit. Is it upright or graceful, dense or open in growth? There is a proper place for each.
The following factors are also important, whether your wall is an informal border or a tightly clipped hedge: 
•  Consider soil and exposure. Some plants do not thrive in poor dry soils. If we have poor soil or difficult exposure, select varieties that are recommended to grow under similar conditions. Use only varieties that are hardy and can be counted upon to produce the expected results.
•  Consider sun and shade in your outdoor living room. Certain varieties will grow well in shade while others do not. Use only shade lovers in shady places.

Any nursery will explain to you that only a few varieties of shrubs will make an excellent hedge, even though nurseries offer a wide plethora of shrubbery. The best hedges will vary based on your section of the country. These hedges will need to be carefully selected for the particular purpose.